Tag Archives: silent film

Fatty Goes to Frisco: A Review of Room 1219 and Comments

The silent film era is riddled with contradiction, confusion and the loss of thousands of the films made before 1927.  As studios began making films, having discovered there was an audience for it, and more importantly, profits to be made, they began cranking them out at an enormous rate.  Making it up as they went along, the early filmmakers had no blueprint or guide to show them how to make films.  They were learning on the job.  Contradiction came in the form of filming technique, story structure and acting styles.  The confusion was determining what the audiences wanted to see, although in the very early days it was such a novelty that practically anything filmed was worthy of the price of admission.

But audiences soon let the early studios know what they liked, as they sought out the studios and filmmakers, like D.W. Griffith at Biograph, because they knew they were getting good entertainment.  These audiences soon became enamored of certain actors and actresses, seeking out films with their favorites.  As actors weren’t given screen credit, they became known by their roles associated with the studios for which they worked.  In 1908, actress Florence Lawrence became known as “The Biograph Girl” and is regarded as the first movie star.  Audience flocked to the films she was in and she soon became in demand for other studios at a higher salary.  (At Biograph, Lawrence was replaced by Mary Pickford.)

Florence Lawrence, The Biograph Girl

With the star system now entrenched, personalities were driving the medium.  Audiences couldn’t get enough of “Little Mary” Pickford, Mary Miles Minter, Wallace Reid, Mabel Normand and Douglas Fairbanks. Comedies were the overall favorite and Charles Chaplin was the most popular star in the world with his Little Tramp character.

Mary Pickford

Mary Pickford

Mary Miles Minter

Mary Miles Minter

Wallace Reid

Wallace Reid

Mabel Normand

Mabel Normand

Douglas Fairbanks

Douglas Fairbanks

Chaplin began in British vaudeville before being discovered by Mack Sennett, who offered him a job at his Keystone Studios.  Chaplin accepted and began working with Mabel Normand, who was the reigning queen of comedy at the time.  Also working at Keystone was a young, rotund comedian named Roscoe Arbuckle.

Roscoe Arbuckle

Roscoe Arbuckle

After Chaplin left Keystone Studios, Sennett, who had great success with the Keystone Kops, began pairing Normand with Arbuckle.  Billed as “Fatty” (a name he hated), Arbuckle played mischievous and naïve hayseed, or appeared in drag.  As he started headlining his own films, he quickly became the second most popular film comedian.  Paramount Studios offered him a three-year, $3,000,000 contract in 1918 (about $46,000,000 today).

Roscoe and Mabe

Roscoe and Mabel

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Arbuckle lived lavishly openly.  He bought a mansion, he bought cars, he threw parties.  Of course he wasn’t alone. This first generation of movie stars, who had grown up in abject poverty, didn’t really know what to do with the buckets of money that came their way.  Prohibition was in effect, but that didn’t stop them from becoming alcoholics.  Drugs, including cocaine, morphine and heroin, were in plentiful supply, often supplied by people who worked for the studios.  It was the era of the casting couch, as hundreds of young women were lured to Hollywood only to find that once they were used, they were discarded quickly.

Roscoe's Pierce-Arrow

Roscoe’s Pierce-Arrow

The studios had people that tried to control all elements of the press and presented only the best face to the public.  But, you can’t keep good gossip away, and there was plenty to talk about.  While it seemed Hollywood was playing, many in America became concerned and there was some grass-roots movements beginning to form with the sole purpose of cleaning up the movies.

Greg Merritt’s new book, Room 1219:  The Life of Fatty Arbuckle, the Mysterious Death of Virginia Rappe, and the Scandal That Changed Hollywood (September, 2013, Chicago Review Press) is the account of sensational accusations and subsequent trials of Roscoe Arbuckle, following a party held Labor Day weekend in San Francisco.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1613747926/ref=as_li_ss_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=390957&creativeASIN=1613747926&linkCode=as2&tag=greghatfrumi-20

It would seem there is a small renaissance today in the lives of silent film stars.  New biographies are being published of the bigger stars (John Gilbert and Mae Murray) and more obscure film actors (Peg Entwistle and Mary Wickes).  There remains huge interest in silent stars such as Harlow and Garbo (who made the transition into sound), Chaplin, Pickford, director William Desmond Taylor, Mabel Normand, Laurel and Hardy and several others.

The life of Roscoe Arbuckle falls into an odd category.  On one hand, his films have now become relegated to the pile of silent films that seem to end up in bargain bins of DVDs for $1.00, even while becoming easier to view (YouTube).

His story isn’t of his success as a comedian and silent film star; it’s the story of his being accused, initially of murder, and subsequently, manslaughter, and the salaciousness that followed.  The story of Roscoe “Fatty” Arbuckle is legend.  It’s the nagging details that are muddled.

Thankfully, Merritt’s book takes a close look at all the evidence, all the while putting Arbuckle’s place in history in perspective.  Merritt reviews autopsy reports, trial transcripts, police and coroner testimony, newspaper articles and never before published interviews to give a very balanced analysis of what could have happened that Labor Day of 1921.

Here’s the story in brief:  By 1921, Arbuckle was big box office.  His films were popular all over America and the world.  He was loved by everyone; on screen he was one of us.  Arbuckle had just completed the film, Freight Prepaid, for Paramount and was working on his next feature film.  He needed a break and took a small entourage to San Francisco, where they would have a party in the suites of the Hotel St. Francis.

Hotel St. Francis.  Roscoe's bank of suites were at the top left in the first building.

Hotel St. Francis. Roscoe’s bank of suites were at the top left in the first building.

Room 1219 today

Room 1219 today

Throughout the weekend, people would come and go.  There was alcohol and plenty of it.  On Monday, an actress whom Arbuckle knew slightly, Virginia Rappe, came up to the party and after a few drinks, began talking to Arbuckle.

Virginia Rappe

Virginia Rappe

One of the strengths of Room 1219 is its most thorough biography of Virginia Rappe.  Previous books on the Arbuckle case portray her as a desperate actress or prostitute.  Merritt shows she actually had some success in Hollywood and had other opportunities.  When she was talking to Arbuckle, it would make sense that she would ask him for work.

She was also pretty, Arbuckle was flirty, drinks were being served, it was a party.  The two of them slipped away into Room 1219.

What followed changed the lives of both of them.  Rappe was injured, her bladder ruptured.  No one at the time knew how serious it was.  Arbuckle left her in the care of others and the party broke up.

Rappe died four days later.  Based on the testimony of others at the party, including Rappe companion Maude Delmont who never testified in open court, Arbuckle was arrested for the murder in an attempt to perpetrate rape of Virginia Rappe.

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Roscoe's Mug Shot

Roscoe’s Mug Shot

The charge was eventually reduced to manslaughter and the trial of the century was on and on and on.  There would be three trials in all.  Merritt breaks down each one, showing the lame attempts by the show-boating prosecution to introduce hearsay evidence, twisted testimony and wild speculation.  Of course, the defense did Arbuckle no favors, at least during the first two trials. They seemed unprepared at times, believing that no jury could find it in them to convict one of America’s greatest clowns.  Merritt provides the pertinent transcripts of the trials, showing where the evidence is favorable to Arbuckle, but also shows the holes in his alibi.

The first trial

The first trial

The Prosecution, Roscoe and the Defense Team

The Prosecution, Roscoe and the Defense Team

This was the era of newspapers and Arbuckle was front page news for months, at least until the third trial. By then, other Hollywood stories had grabbed the headlines:  the suicide of Olive Thomas (married to Jack Pickford, brother of Mary) in Paris, the murder of William Desmond Taylor (still unsolved to this day) and the death of matinee idol and drug addict Wallace Reid.

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At the third trial, Arbuckle was acquitted in less than 10 minutes.  But the damage had already been done.  His career was over.  His films were still banned practically all over the country.  Will Hays had been appointed head of the new Motion Picture Producers and Distributors of America, which, basically, was a self-serving reform group.  Hays was the puppet of the studio heads and one of his first edicts was to ban Arbuckle permanently from working in any studio in Hollywood.

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Room 1219 also details Arbuckle’s exile from Hollywood;   Hays’ reversal; and Arbuckle’s subsequent comeback as a director, stage performer and, ultimately, his return to acting in film.  Using all the evidence put into place in the book, Merritt provides a good, logical theory on what really happened that day in San Francisco.  It was an event that should have ended differently.  The lives of two people were ruined that day.  Rappe lost her life and Arbuckle lost everything.

Room 1219 will be welcomed by all film buffs as the most complete account of the Arbuckle trials.  It’s hard to believe 92 years later, there is still new evidence being discovered and new theories advanced.  Fascinating and full of new information about the case, its participants and victims, Room 1219 engages the reader from start to finish with no happy endings in sight.

Virginia Rappe Grave at Hollywood Forever Cemetary

Virginia Rappe Grave at Hollywood Forever Cemetery

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A Small Appreciation of D.W. Griffith

Over the years, I’ve become a fan of the work of D.W. Griffith, one of the pioneers of early film making.  Griffith worked with Thomas Edison as an actor and writer, before moving to the American Mutoscope and Biograph Company, or just Biograph, as an actor.  He complained so much about the directing, that they gave him a chance.  This was in 1908. Griffith would go on to make thousands of one-reelers (about 10-12 minutes long) until 1913 when he quit Biograph because he wanted to make longer films.

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Griffith’s use of cross-cutting, close-ups, flashbacks and editing allowed him to rise to the top of the directors working in silent film.  He had a remarkable cast, too, that began to receive recognition for their work in the films.  Such actors as Mary Pickford, Lillian Gish, Mabel Normand, Mack Sennett, Wallace Reid, and many others began, or worked with Griffith at Biograph.  Pickford was so popular, she became known as “The Biograph Girl” and parlayed that exposure into a huge movie contract.

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Mary Pickford

Griffith would go on to make many of the cinema’s greatest films:  Way Down East, Intolerance, Orphans of the Storm, Broken Blossoms, and others.  The Birth of a Nation became the most successful film in its day, launching the careers of dozens of men who would later become studio moguls, producers and theater owners.  (Today, The Birth of a Nation is a pariah in the Griffith canon due to its overt tones of racism.)

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Lillian Gish starred in many Griffith films, including the last three above.

Lillian Gish starred in many Griffith films, including the last three above.

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(The image on the right is the big centerpiece of Intolerance, with its cast of thousands and huge scenery pieces.)

In 1919, Griffith, Pickford, Douglas Fairbanks, and Charlie Chaplin founded United Artists, an independent film studio where the producers made the decisions, not the studio heads.

From L to R, Fairbanks, Pickford, Griffith, and Chaplin. At the time, all but Griffith were the biggest stars in the world. Griffith would be the first to sell his interests. Chaplin and Pickford held onto to their ownership of the company until the 1950’s.

(There are two terrific books on the history of United Artists by Tino Balio:

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http://www.amazon.com/United-Artists-Volume-1919-1950-Company/dp/029923004X/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_y

and

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http://www.amazon.com/United-Artists-Volume-1951-1978-Industry/dp/0299230147/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_y

You would think that after making all of these important films, D.W. Griffith would be recognized in Hollywood for the genius he was and he would have lived out his life with the love and admiration of all his peers.

Not so fast.  He lived his final years alone, not able to get work, alcoholic, and broke.  His films had made millions for others, but he was unable to keep his money.  He had often put his own money into his work and lost it when the films didn’t make it back quickly enough.

In 1940, Iris Barry, the first curator of The Museum of Modern Art Film Library, put together a large exhibition on Griffith, with the purpose of restoring the fame and reputation of the director.  Griffith was still alive then, and cooperated with Barry on a monograph, short essays, that accompanied the exhibition.  It was the first retrospective of Griffith’s career, and one that made the argument that Griffith was not just a pioneer of cinema, but a ground-breaking director, whose films incorporated practically every technique still used today.

I found the second edition of this book yesterday at a used book shop.

http://www.amazon.com/D-W-Griffith-American-Master/dp/1422351289/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1373820375&sr=8-3&keywords=iris+barry

The second edition has been expanded because in 1965, the Museum ran another Griffith exhibition and reprinted the original manuscript by Barry and expanded it with a long addendum by the director of the Griffith exhibition, Eileen Bowser.  It also has an interview with Billy Bitzer, Griffith’s longtime cameraman.

Griffith died in 1948, alone, penniless.  He is buried outside of Louisville at the  at Mount Tabor Methodist Church Graveyard in Centerfield, Kentucky.  His grave was unmarked for a couple of years, until the Director’s Guild provided a marker.  A re-dedication of his grave was attended by Lillian Gish, Mary Pickford and Richard Barthlemess, all who had appeared in Griffith films.

Gish also wrote a book about Griffith, now out of print, but available used.

http://www.amazon.com/Lillian-Gish-The-Movies-Griffith/dp/B000OFFK8S/ref=sr_1_21?ie=UTF8&qid=1373821838&sr=8-21&keywords=lillian+gish

One last thing, when I was a student at Northern Kentucky University, in 1979, there was a dedication on campus that unveiled a new statue by celebrated artist, Red Grooms.  It depicted Griffith directing a scene from Way Down East, with Lillian Gish on the ice floe, and cameraman Billy Bitzer cranking away.

Red Grooms at the dedication in 1979.

Red Grooms at the dedication in 1979.

The statue received prominent placement on campus, between the Fine Arts building and the new Student Activities building.  I must have passed it a million times, going from one place to the next.  I knew who Griffith was, of course, and knew that he had been born in Kentucky, but really didn’t give it much thought.

The dedication seems to be going nicely.

The dedication seems to be going nicely.

The artwork was loaned out frequently and when it was returned, it was relocated to another part of campus: the banks of Lake Inferior, behind the Fine Arts building,

The sculpture in its new location.

The sculpture in its new location.

As the Grooms artwork remained on campus, there grew an uneasiness about Griffith’s past history with race relations.  In 2004, the sculpture was dismantled, where it remains in storage to this day.

Being from the South, Griffith always believed that he impartially showed what happened after the Civil War in The Birth of a Nation.  What he didn’t realize was there was a new attitude in the United States toward race.  For many people, gone was the hatred, replaced by acceptance.  Griffith’s display of race relations in The Birth of a Nation, even though it represented events happening 50 years ago, was not keeping with the mood of the country in present day 1915.

His next film, Intolerance, in 1916, was an answer to those critics, who believed he was intolerant of race.  This is Griffith’s finest film, cross cut throughout  with four different stories, showing mans intolerance to others always led to ruin.  Running over three hours, it was the most expensive film of that time.

Lillian Gish called him “the father of film” and Charles Chaplin called him “the teacher of us all”.  Griffith still remains a vital part of cinema history and there will always be film critics and historians trying to determine just how important.

Hollywood loves a story where someone at the height of their career takes a fall.  Takes a huge, long, career-busting fall.  Maybe that’s why I admire D.W. Griffith.  Maybe that’s why I admire Orson Welles.   Orson used to say, “Oh, how they’ll miss me when I’ m gone.”  And that’s certainly the case.  Welles also said, in spite of his own treatment by the Hollywood establishment,  “I have never really hated Hollywood except for its treatment of D. W. Griffith. No town, no industry, no profession, no art form owes so much to a single man.”

Sight and Sound’s Tunnel Vision

All the roar over film magazine Sight and Sound‘s latest Greatest Movie poll accomplishes one thing:  It gets us talking about films that might otherwise go neglected.  In a time where remakes galore and unimaginative comedies rule the box office, there was a time when studios wanted to produce quality motion pictures for their audiences.  Duly noted is the fact that no film past 1968 made the Top Ten (Kubrick’s 2001).

Director D.W. Griffith was the leading director of motion pictures in the early days of silent movies.  He is credited for popularizing many cinematic techniques that have become staples of film-making.  Close-ups, dissolves, cutaway reaction shots – all are the first thing any aspiring filmmaker uses when starting their career.  From 1908 through 1914, Griffith made “one-reelers” for Biograph, a leading movie company in New York.  These were shorts, about 15 minutes in length that generally played for a week, and then were swapped out for another one.  (That’s why many of the films of this era are lost.  No one thought that they had any value beyond their moment in the theater.)

As Griffith perfected his storytelling and technical craft, he became influenced by some of the longer films coming out of Europe and the work of others now working in Hollywood, including producer Thomas Ince.  Griffith began working on a Biblical drama, Judith of Bethulia, which was to be one of the first U.S. feature films.  To the dismay of the studio heads (because features cost more money), longer films were accepted by audiences.  In 1915, Griffith released his controversial film, The Birth of a Nation, which made so much money “they lost track” of it, according to Lillian Gish, who appeared in the film.

By then, studios were looking for any advantage to entice audiences to their films.  Adolf Zukor, an immigrant from Hungary who had become quite successful in the fur business, got into the movie business and, in 1912, started Famous Players Studio.  His idea was to entice famous actors of the day, putting them into roles of classic theater.  “Famous Players in Famous Plays” was the company’s slogan.  Zukor picked up a French film starring Sarah Bernhardt, which did great business stateside.  He is credited for creating the star system on Hollywood, and later, after his merger with Jesse Lasky to form a corporation that would become Paramount Studios, he released films with such stars as Mary Pickford, Rudolph Valentino, Douglas Fairbanks, Gloria Swanson, and Clara Bow – the biggest stars of their day.

So what does this have to with the 2012 Sight and Sound Greatest Films of All Time, or whatever it’s called?  Seven silent films are included in the Top Fifty, with three in the Top Ten alone.  This can be encouraging to filmgoers.  If the list entices someone to check out F.W. Murnau’s Sunrise from 1927, which made the list at #5, or Chaplin’s brilliant City Lights, or Buster Keaton’s The General, both of which made Top Fifty, along with the others, then it has achieved a higher purpose.  As I mentioned earlier, debate about films is one of those of those great discussions that rank right up there with sports talk, politics, and the national furor over The Sexiest Man Alive.

Alright, time now for my thoughts on the displacement of Citizen Kane as the Greatest Film the World Has Ever Known, Will Know, and Forever Let It Be Said That It Is the Greatest Film, etc…

It’s no secret that I am a big Orson Welles fan and not much of a Hitchcock fan.  Citizen Kane isn’t even my favorite Welles film (that would be The Magnificent Ambersons) and Vertigo isn’t my favorite Hitchcock film (that would be North by Northwest).  But, I’m not upset about the rankings.  It’s only a list.

Most discouraging are the headlines for every article about the Sight and Sound Poll (all actual headlines):

Citizen Kane‘ Dethroned by ‘Vertigo‘ as Greatest Film of All Time

Three Theories for How Vertigo Dethroned Kane

Alfred Hitchcock’s Vertigo Beats Citizen Kane to Be Declared the Best Film of All Time!

Hitchcock Knocks Welles Off Top of ‘Greatest Film’ Poll

How the mighty have fallen.  Kane won the poll for five consecutive decades, and even won the AFI’s poll in 1998 and 2007.  It’s almost a repeat of Orson Welles’ own personal topple when his RKO contract was terminated, after basically three films and an unfinished project, and began the life-long journey of becoming a acting/directing gypsy (and of course making some of the other greatest films in the process).  Even Welles recognized his predicament when he said, “I started at the top and worked my way down.”  (He also told Peter Bogdanovich, “Oh, how they’ll miss me when I’m gone.”)

It’s not the end of world for Kane fans.  It did place second, after all.  It’s not like Citizen Kane has to pack up and leave town in shame, run out on a rail, never to be seen again.  As cinema, it is a masterpiece.  It’s a tour de force for Welles, who was only 25 years old when he acted, directed and co-wrote Citizen Kane.  It was his first film.  Hitchcock had been a working director for over 30 years when he made Vertigo.

I’m sure many of you who take film seriously, and even those who don’t, have their own favorite films that don’t even include any films by Welles or Hitchcock.  The Director’s Poll in the same Sight and Sound survey picks Yasujiro’s Tokyo Story as Number One, with Citizen Kane tied for Second with 2001:  A Space OdysseyVertigo is Number Seven.

So, we have the pleasure of open discourse about film, and more importantly, all the films in the Sight and Sound poll are available for viewing.  No matter what your favorite film is, whether it be 8 ½, The Godfather, or even Porky’s (which would be sad), the Greatest Movie Ever Made will continue to be a discussion as long as there are people around with an opinion.