Category Archives: Theater

Tickets Now On Sale!

Tickets are now on sale for The Drama Workshop’s Home Brew Theater show June 7, 8 and 9, at TDW in Cheviot. This show consists of ten 10 minute plays. I have a play I wrote in it called The Ten Minute Play (with a Nice Picture of Jimmy Carter) and I’m directing The Lesson by Teri Foltz. This is going to be a fun evening, so I hope to see many of you there.

 

Home Brew

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The Gingerbread Lady

I will be directing the play, Lessons, by Teri Foltz, for The Drama Workshop’s Home Brew Festival, featuring productions of short plays by local authors. The show dates are June 7, 8 and 9 at the Glenmore Playhouse in Cheviot.

My own play, The Ten Minute Play (with a Nice Picture of Jimmy Carter), will also be part of the festival.

In the Summer of 1974, I directed my first full-length play, The Gingerbread Lady by Neil Simon. One of Simon’s more dark comedies, TGL is the story of Evy, a singer, whose career and life is destroyed by her drinking.

During the Spring of 1974, I was a student at Northern Kentucky University, as a theater major. I had had a lot of fun directing Edward Albee’s The Sandbox and a few scenes form other plays in classes, including a great version of the closing scene of Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Jennifer Burkhart was one of the best actresses at NKU and frustrated because she couldn’t find a part that she wanted to play. She brought me a copy of the play and asked if I would look at it and, if I liked it, we could go to the theater head, Bill Parsons, and see if we could do it as summer show. I did like it and pitched it to Dr. Parsons, who agreed to give us a little money to put it on.

So, I was part of great group of friends with theater sound, lighting, props and production experience, so there was no doubt that they were going work on it. This was going to be the first totally student produced show at in NKU’s history. In Nunn Hall, there was a small theater, holding around 150, so after Spring semester was out, we moved in and began to work on the show.

I don’t even think we had auditions. Jennifer was going to be Evy, after all, it was her idea. I cast friends in the other roles. Greg Carstens as Jimmy, Frankie Banta as Polly, Susan Rogers as Tory, Mike Salzman as Manuel and Jerry Helm as Lou.

Mike, Jerry, Debby Wolff and me practically lived in that theater for the two months leading up to the show. Debby was our props mistress and we had a great looking set, designed by Jerry. We even had running water in the set kitchen.

We had some anxieties throughout the rehearsals. Nerves came out. It was a big show, after all, with nuances that I don’t know if we were successful in presenting, but we had fun, that I do remember.

Auditions for Home Brew’s Festival

For all of my Cincinnati actors.  This is the information about auditioning for The Drama Workshop’s Home Brew Festival.  As you may recall from last time, I have a play, The Ten Minute Play (with a Nice Picture of Jimmy Carter) in the festival and I’m directing one of the plays, Lessons by Teri Foltz.

The Drama Workshop Announces Home Brew Theater auditions: Sunday 3/30 and Monday 4/1.

The Drama Workshop will hold open auditions for its production of Home Brew Theater at 6pm on Sunday, March 31 and 7pm on Monday, April 1 at The TDW ANNEX Building, 3619 Harrison Ave., Cheviot, Ohio, 45211. (Location details below.)

Home Brew is TDW’s annual show case of short plays by local authors, accompanied by a reception featuring beer from West Side Brewery. Home Brew will run the weekend of June 7-9, 2019. This year Home Brew Theater is supported by a generous grant from Summer Fair Cincinnati.

There are 7 directors for the 10 plays. Auditions will be in front of the panel of directors.

There are a variety of roles for actors of all genders and ages (except children).

Auditions will consist of cold readings from selected Home Brew short plays. Please also prepare a one-minute monologue. A headshot and resume are appreciated but not required. Auditions will be recorded on video for directors who can’ t be present. Videos will NOT be posted to the public.

Please email questions to the producers at tdw.homebrew@gmail.com

***
The TDW Annex is located at 3619 Harrison Ave. between the “Game Time” bar and “American Trading”. The sign on the building still says “Angel’s Touch”.

https://goo.gl/maps/G1EjSdUWPLR2

It’s around the corner and a few doors down from the Glenmore Playhouse. Please note that you may not park in the lot directly behind 3619 Harrison. There should be ample street parking, or you may park in the public lot at the corner of Glenmore Ave and Gamble Ave.

New Production of The Ten Minute Play and Directing a Play in Cincinnati

To all my Cincinnati friends (and those that want to travel).   I’m happy to announce that I will be participating in The Drama Workshop’s annual Home Brew Theater as a playwright and director.

Home Brew Theater is an annual festival featuring productions of short plays by local authors. The show dates are June 7, 8 and 9 at the Glenmore Playhouse in Cheviot. There’s also a reception following the plays with craft beer from West Side Brewery.

My play, The Ten Minute Play (with a Nice Picture of Jimmy Carter), will be performed. It will be directed by Julie Jordan. The play is a comedy. Some of you may remember that this play had a reading in Kansas City last October and the audience loved it. You will love this play, too, and this gives all my Cincinnati friends the opportunity to finally see what I’ve been doing with my life.

I’m also directing a play for the festival, Lessons by Teri Foltz. This is a warm, touching play that I found absolutely delightful. I think you’ll like it, too. I’m very excited to work on this play.

I want to mention that the Drama Workshop people have been very nice to me and supportive and the Glenmore Playhouse is a wonderful theater to see a play.

I’ll have more information about the plays as the weeks progress, but I hope you’ll save the date and come and see my plays at the Festival. I’m linking to the Drama Workshop’s Facebook page, where they have information on all the plays and ticket reservations.

I’ll see you there.

https://www.facebook.com/groups/TheDramaWorkshop/?fref=nf

 

A Recommendation for My New Play

I have a new play.  It’s called Lily Blossoms or Modern Subdivision Zoning for the Present Day.  It’s a one-act comedy.  Recently, a playwright/reader on New Play Exchange, a website where playwrights can upload their plays and theatre managers, artistic directors, etc., can find new plays to produce.

The play is set in 1954, in New York, and features writers Lily Palmer and Theodore Barkley, who work for Manhattan magazine. But, things will change once Barkley gets an offer from a movie studio and has to move to California.

This is the season when theatre companies ask for submissions and I wanted to have a new play ready to submit.  I worked on this play in November and December and finished it early January.  I like it.  It’s funny and the characters are among my favorites.  I even got to name drop a favorite character from one of my other plays.

This recommendation is from Steven G. Martin, a fellow playwright:

 Sophisticated humor — through wit, wordplay, and charm — infuse this light, one-act comedy set in 1950s New York. Hatfield clearly understands and enjoys the high-brow charm of shows of this period, and has created a group of characters — world wearing magazine writers, a misled wife, and a tortured editor — that fits right in. Stylish and enchanting. 

If you see this post and know a theatrical producer, please pass this along.  Hopefully, a company will like the play and decide to produce it.

2018 was a good year for me, professionally.  Two of my plays, The Great Stalinski and The Ten Minute Play (With a Nice Picture of Jimmy Carter), received readings. in Kansas City and Pittsburgh, respectively.   Another play, Mundy Tuesday Friday, was a finalist for a theatre company in Virginia.

2019 is off to a good start, too.  I’ll have some news a bit later on about some theatrical work I’m doing in Cincinnati.

Play Reading of The Great Stalinski

My play, The Great Stalinski, will be given a reading by the Pittsburgh New Works Reading Series, on Monday, November 5.

The Reading Series will be be held at Higher Voice Studios, 144 E Main St, Carnegie, PA 15106, at 7:00 p.m.  Their website is https://pittsburghnewworks.org/reading-series/

The Great Stalinski was selected as a finalist for the Pittsburgh New Works Festival in 2018, but just didn’t make the final cut of 18 produced plays.  Out of hundreds of submissions, my play and about 39 others were finalists.  The Reading Series is taking the plays that didn’t make it and giving them a reading over the course of the winter with local actors.

Of course I’m thrilled to be included.

The Great Stalinski is a personal favorite of my plays, as it started what I call “The Cabot Trilogy.”  Let me explain:  The play is about the third generation of Cabot actors who are gathered together for the funeral the “World’s Greatest Shakespearean Actor,” Gregor Stalinski.  Brothers Jack and Monty and sister Veronica Cabot were close to Stalinski (especially Veronica) and they meet up at Jack’s theater to travel together to the funeral.  The Cabots are theater royalty and the play is really a fun piece about theater history and fame.

So after writing it, that got me to thinking about the other generations of Cabots and I wrote a play about Jack, Monty and Veronica’s parents called Three Sisters in Repertory.  I love that play.  The characters are great.  We meet Charles Cabot, their father, and three sisters, Virginia, Eve and Roz Fleming.  I’m guessing that one of them becomes their mother.  Again, theater history is evident as scenes are played from Pygmalion, Hamlet and The Importance of Being Earnest.

So I had to write a play about the First Generation of Cabots and I wrote the first act of what would become The Cabots of Broadway, where we meet Kate and John Cabot, who start the whole family on a theatrical career.

Act Two is Three Sister in Repertory and Act Three is The Great Stalinski.  I’m really proud of this play and have been sending it out religiously.

As always, my plays are on New Play Exchange.  I’m sorry more of you can’t see or read the plays just yet, but I’m working on it.  It’s hard work.

Some Nice Words About My Ten Minute Play.

So, if you’re a fan of my blog (and maybe you should be), I’ve discovered that earlier in the month a couple of playwrights on the New Play Exchange, where I host my plays hoping that someone will read them and want to produce them, have read my play, The Ten Minute Play (with a Nice Picture of Jimmy Carter).

I am thrilled to say that both liked the play very much and have written some wonderful comments about that are posted on my New Play Exchange profile.

Here’s what they said:

2 Oct. 2018
 I think every writer, but especially those of ten minute plays, can relate to this ten minute play about ten minute plays and writing in general. From explaining what a ten minute play is, to thinking that what we’ve crafted is the best ten minute play ever. sing a picture of Jimmy Carter seems to be about the most ten minute play thing ever. Did I mention this is a ten minute play about ten minute plays? Because it is and I think it might be slightly brilliant. 

 

2 Oct. 2018
 Irreverently funny, Greg Hatfield strikes the right tone with a two-hander reminiscent of the style of May/Nichols. 
Thank you, Everett and Robert.  I really appreciate it.
Everett is hailed as “one of our best new children’s authors” by Heartland Play Publishers, Everett Robert is an award winning author, playwright, actor, and director with over 20 years of experience.  His website is:  http://www.emergencyroomproductions.com
Robert is a playwright with many productions under his belt.
Both men are members of the New Play Exchange.  I had the opportunity to meet both men at the Midwest Dramatists Conference recently, where our plays were given a reading, and their plays stood out among the group.
Thanks again, guys.

What’s New?

So, writing plays is pretty cool.  My one-act play, The Ten Minute Play (With a Nice Picture of Jimmy Carter) has been selected for a reading at the Midwest Dramatist Conference in late September, in Kansas City.  I’ll be attending and participating in panels and see my play being performed.

Another one-act play, Mundy Tuesday Friday, was selected over the summer as a Finalist by the Shakespeare in the Burg theater company in Middleburg, Virginia.  Of course, it would have been nice to have the play actually produced, but the director of the company is very nice.  I’ve received several nice rejections for this play from other companies.   One day, somebody’s going to pick this up and stage it.

The biggest news (and I know I’m burying the lede) is that I just finished a full-length play called The Cabots of Broadway.  It’s a comedy about three generations of actors.  Each act is about one generation and how they became the First Family of the Theater.  I’ve been submitting it to theater festivals around the country in the hopes that someone loves it and wants to do it.   I love it.  It’s my best work so far.

All of my plays ( I have several)  are available on New Play Exchange (https://newplayexchange.org/users/14397/greg-hatfield) under my name.

So there you have it.  Updates.  While you’re here, go ahead and read some of the older posts.  The Crosby post is good, as is the Grace Metalious post.  I’m also fond of the Harpo and Dorothy Parker posts.  And if you want to cry a little, The Day the Sheriff Shot My Dog is up your alley.

Thanks for reading.

Der Bingle: A Short Appreciation of Bing Crosby

 

Der Bingle:  A Short Appreciation of Bing Crosby

 

He was once the most popular singer ever.

He recorded over 1600 songs over a 58 year recording career.  His records have sold over one billion copies.  He had 38 number one hits, including the most popular song ever.

He appeared on about 4000 radio programs.

His television show regularly was watched by over 50 million people weekly.

He appeared in 83 movies and sold over one billion tickets, which puts him third overall on the most popular actor category, behind Clark Gable and John Wayne.  He was nominated for 4 Academy Awards and won one, and introduced fourteen Oscar nominated songs in these films, which won four.

He is largely forgotten, with the exception of this time of year, where his music is rotated liberally and his name is synonymous with the holiday season.

He is Bing Crosby whose life and legacy still live on among those of us who cherish popular singing.

An early Crosby album on Decca.

An early Crosby album on Decca.

 

And that’s what he was, a popular singer, singing songs of every type and genre, with an easy-going style that belied his immense talent.  Bing made it look easy and everyone, from all walks of life, would enjoy his music.  And man, that voice, that incomparable voice; that deep baritone that takes every musical phrase seriously and glides it to its musical height.  Jazz, ballads, blues, cowboy songs, hymns, show tunes – he sang practically everything, captivating his audience with those full, rich notes.  They clung to every word, every syllable, as Bing invented what became the crooner.  Many tried to imitate.  Sinatra started out as a Bing clone.

What made me start thinking of Crosby was the programming of local radio.  Several stations here in Cincinnati – as I am sure other cities have done the same thing — have begun playing Christmas music 24/7.  I had the occasion to listen to a large block of that programming one night and noticed that, roughly, one out of six songs were songs by Crosby, including at least two versions of White Christmas, the aforementioned most popular song ever, with sales of over 100 million.

WhiteChristmasPoster

 

I thought about that.  I thought about how much I like Crosby’s music and mused sadly that this is probably the only time of the year in which Crosby is played on mainstream radio.  SiriusXM radio even has a channel devoted this time of year called “Bing Crosby Christmas Radio”.  To be fair, you can listen to Crosby songs on Sirius’ 40’s channel and Pandora and Spotify also program Crosby music into your specific playlists.

TMC does show the occasional Crosby film, Going My Way being the most popular.  Sometimes a Bob Hope/Bing Crosby “Road” picture pops up, but these are mostly dated comedies and, as much as I love Bob Hope, his humor is very topical and era-specific.

Going My Way poster

Yes, Bing Crosby has some skeletons in his closet.  He could be aloof and dismissive.  He probably wasn’t the greatest father to his four sons by his first marriage, but apparently redeemed himself by his second marriage, with three children.

(There’s a biography of Bing called The Hollow Man, which presents a less than flattering portrait of him.  For years, during my friends and my annual White Elephant Christmas party, we gave away the same copy of this book each year to some unsuspecting recipient, who was obliged to give it away the following year.

An unflattering look at Bing.

An unflattering look at Bing.

My friend, Rick Simms, né Clem Coffee, said that if “One fifth of what was written in that book is true, Bing Crosby was the most despicable man who ever lived.”  And Clem liked Bing Crosby.

A better biography is Gary Giddins’ Bing Crosby:  A Pocketful of Dreams, The Early Years 1903-1940.  This came out in 2001, with a promised second volume that is taking some time to see print.

So, this holiday season, when you hear Bing Crosby sing those delightful Christmas carols that can make the other ones seem lame, pause and reflect just one minute that the man you’re listening to is a superstar in the world of popular music.  And if you have Pandora or Spotify, give a listen to some of his other non-holiday music.  I’ll bet you’ll end up liking it and wanting more.  Now, if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to put on my vinyl copy of Bing Sings Whilst Bregman Swings.

 

 

 

 

Dorothy Parker: “I do not care what is written about me so long as it is not true.”

A while back, I presented a book proposal on the deaths of famous writers.  An editor suggested it for me and I sketched out some rough outlines of Poe, Hemingway and my favorite, Dorothy Parker.  Since I’m terribly late in posting my latest story, I’m filling in with this chestnut, complete now with visuals.  I hope you enjoy it. — Hat

Dorothy Parker:  “I do not care what is written about me so long as it is not true.”

When Dorothy Parker died on June 7, 1967, her death surprised many people.  After reading her obituary in the New York Times, they shook their heads in disbelief.  They thought she had died years ago.  Indeed, death came much too late in life for Mrs. Parker.  The famed literary wit of the 1920’s had, after all, attempted suicide on at least three different occasions.  After her second attempt, her friend, the humorist Robert Benchley warned her that if she wasn’t careful she was “likely to make herself sick.”   On her 70th birthday, she said if she had any manners, she “should be dead by now.  All of my friends are.”

Mrs. Parker and Mr. Benchley

Alone and forgotten at her death, Dottie had lived the last years of her life in her beloved New York, where she had made her biggest contribution.  She was the darling of the Algonquin Round Table, whose ranks included the most famous drama critic of the day Alexander Woollcott;  widely read newspaper columnist Franklin P. Adams (from whose poetry style of light verse Dottie borrowed heavily);  award-winning playwright George S. Kaufman;  and the New Yorker founder Harold Ross.  Ironically, she outlived all but two of its members.

File:Algrt.jpg

The Algonquin Round Table by Al Hirschfeld

Dottie was one of the original staffers at Ross’ new magazine, the New Yorker, where she is credited with creating the prototypical “New Yorker Short Story,” that is a story under 7000 words, urbane, witty and well-written.  But her biggest success came from her poetry;  short, humorous poems, usually about suicide or failed relationships, that she called “trifles,” never taking it seriously, but nonetheless knowing its popularity among her readers.  In the early days of the struggling magazine, Ross scolded her for turning in an article late.  “Sorry,” she said, “someone else was using the pencil.”

The New Yorker’s first issue, 1925
Mrs. Parker, Benchley and Woollcott were all on the “advisory” staff

“I hate writing.  I love having written.”

She published seven books during her lifetime, collections of her short stories and poetry, including Enough Rope (1926), Sunset Gun (1927), Death and Taxes (1931) and After Such Pleasures (1933).  She won the O. Henry Prize for “Outstanding Short Story” in 1939 for her story, Big BlondeA collection from her entire body of work, The Portable Dorothy Parker, was first published in 1944 and remains in print today, bringing thousands of new readers every year.  As she grew older, she and her then-husband Alan Campbell moved to Hollywood, where they worked on screenplays.  Dottie, Alan and Robert Carson were nominated for an Academy Award for their screenplay for the 1937 film, A Star is Born.

Always a champion for social causes, upon her death Mrs. Parker left her entire estate to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  Upon his assassination, the rights reverted to the NAACP.  Author Lillian Hellman was the executor of Dottie’s estate, but never claimed her ashes for burial, after finding out, and getting angry, that Dottie hadn’t left her the rights to her literary works.  Mrs. Parker’s ashes languished in a box in an attorney’s office for over fifteen years before the NAACP took Dottie’s remains and interred them in a memorial garden at their national headquarters in Baltimore, Maryland.  Dorothy had her own suggestion for her epitaph:

“Excuse my dust.”

Sidebar:

The United States Postal Service issued a commemorative stamp with her likeness, as part of the Literary Arts series on August 22, 1992, on what would have been Mrs. Parker’s 99th birthday.

Mrs. Parker isn’t the only Round Table member to be commemorated on a postage stamp.  Others include:

Artist Neysa McMein

Author Edna Ferber

Playwright Moss Hart

A film of her life, Mrs. Parker and the Vicious Circle, directed by Alan Rudolph and starring Jennifer Jason Leigh, was released in 1994 and released on DVD in 2006.

See the trailer here:

http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi1621950745/